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Giveaway – Studies in the Pauline Epistles: Essays in Honor of Douglas J. Moo

A few months ago I reviewed the Festschrift that was presented to Douglas Moo at last year’s ETS annual meeting (Part 1; Part 2; Part 3). This past weekend a friend gave me a goodie bag which contained a copy of this book, so I’m going to give it to one of you 🙂 Douglas Moo needs no introduction, and it’s obvious that this book is a treat for all Pauline studies nerds, especially those who appreciate the contributions of Moo. Since I don’t have a self-hosted site I can’t use one of those fancy giveaway widgets, so you’ll have to do a bit more work for entries. Here are the various ways you can enter (comment separately for each to gain more entries):

  1. Comment on one way Moo’s scholarship has impacted you
  2. Comment on one issue in Pauline studies that fascinates you
  3. Follow me on Twitter and comment saying you did
  4. Tweet the giveaway and comment saying you did
  5. Share the giveaway via any and any other social media platform and comment saying you did
  6. Subscribe to my blog and comment saying you did.

You can tweet the giveaway once a day for additional entries, just comment saying you did. The giveaway is open to residents of the contiguous US only (unless you’re going to the SBL annual meeting this year, in which case I can give it to you there if you win) and closes at 11:59PM EST on Thursday, May 21. I will use a random number generator to select the winning comment, and the winner will be announced on Friday, May 22. You can check out my reviews to whet your appetite if you missed them the first time around (Part 1; Part 2; Part 3). Below is the video of the presentation of the Festschrift.

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87 Comments

  1. I first encountered Moo’s work in his Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary on Romans. It was an eye-opening read for a student relatively new to the world of scholarship.

    Liked by 1 person

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  2. Followed on Twitter.

    Liked by 1 person

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  3. I’ll be writing my dissertation on an aspect of Pauline eschatology in the light of Greco-Roman literature. I’ll keep it a μυστηριον per the advice of others!

    Liked by 1 person

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  4. I follow you on Twitter. Beware.

    Liked by 1 person

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  5. Tweeted/Retweeted the Giveaway.

    Liked by 1 person

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  6. I tweeted the giveaway.

    Liked by 1 person

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  7. Shared post via Pursuing Veritas Facebook page.

    Liked by 1 person

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  8. Shared on Google +.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  9. Signed up to follow your blog.

    Liked by 1 person

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  10. Shared on Facebook.

    Liked by 1 person

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  11. I first encountered Moo several years ago while working on a New Testament course through his “Introducing the New Testament.” Greatly enjoyed his work then, and continue to learn from his work now.

    Also, I follow this blog.

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  12. Reblogged your post.

    Liked by 1 person

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  13. K. Ingram

     /  May 13, 2015

    Tweeted the Giveaway

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  14. Reblogged this on Daniel N. Gullotta and commented:
    Win a FREE BOOK from my friend Jennifer Guo!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  15. Tweeted it, and I’ll be at the annual meeting to collect it!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  16. brianroden

     /  May 13, 2015

    I already follow you on Twitter, so first entry.

    Liked by 1 person

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  17. brianroden

     /  May 13, 2015

    I just tweeted your link to the giveaway, so #2

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  18. brianroden

     /  May 13, 2015

    I used the Spanish edition of Moo’s NIV Life Application Commentary (while listening to his Romans lectures from biblicaltraining.org) to prepare for leading a Wednesday night walk through Romans for our Latino ministry.

    Liked by 1 person

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  19. Raffi Kay

     /  May 13, 2015

    i just subscribed to your blog :-).

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  20. Reblogged this on Talmidimblogging and commented:
    Please check out this generous giveaway!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  21. Jeannie Koh

     /  May 13, 2015

    I subscribed to your blg!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  22. Jeannie Koh

     /  May 13, 2015

    Prof. Douglas Moo in an interview once explained that he entered biblical scholarship because he overprepared sermons and had too many questions to answer. So rather than being a pastor or frontline ministry person, he thought that scholarship was to be his path. That is helpful to me, for on a much smaller scale, I relate to this.

    Liked by 1 person

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  23. Jeannie Koh

     /  May 13, 2015

    Prof. Moo’s tome on Romans (NICNT) shows me how a humble scholar, full of rigour and intellectual care, dedicated to the glory and truth of God, begins to approach Paul’s weighty letter. His method of first looking at all major works, and then starting his exegetical process is unique, a reverse of what most scholars do, and an approach I have attempted in my papers.

    Liked by 1 person

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  24. Jeannie Koh

     /  May 13, 2015

    I follow you on twitter.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  25. Jeannie Koh

     /  May 13, 2015

    And Jennifer, God’s richest blessings as you start your formal biblical studies. Funny thing is, the day before you announced it, I was thinking to God how good it would be for you to engage in such an endeavour. My continued prayers and thanksgiving.

    Liked by 1 person

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    • Jeannie, Thanks for sharing about how you were thinking I should engage in formal studies the day before my announcement. That’s kind of cool and funny, and in a small way a further confirmation for me 🙂

      Thanks for your kind words and prayers! Are you in seminary right now? If so, where?

      I also loved everything you wrote about Dr. Moo. His NICNT on Romans was the first commentary I ever bought, so it will forever have a special place in my heart 🙂

      Like

      Reply
  26. I followed you on twitter two days ago — does that count? 🙂 Also, I’ve subscribed to your feed.

    All things besides though, Moo has contributed overwhelming to Pauline Studies over the last several decades, so much so — that it’s hard to pinpoint a specific area where he hasn’t had influence. Admittedly, for myself, it’s probably leaning more on the concept of justification. I think, along with Guy Walters, that Moo has taken charge at dealing with the increasingly popular concept of the New Perspective on Paul (NPP), which Dunn and Wright advocate.

    As someone who affirms and subscribes to reformed theology (the 1689 LBCF), I find the NPP movement both interesting yet troubling in how they frame our relationship with God and what that actually entails. Specifically, in that it ever creeps closer to a works-based framework.

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    • Brett, it does count that you already follow me on Twitter 🙂 But if you comment separately for each entry method you’d get more entries (so you’d get three in this case – twitter, feed, and comment on how Moo’s scholarship has impacted you). If you want you can comment two more times and copy/paste what you’ve written to get the entries. But don’t reply to this if you do, make new comments (I’m not including reply comments for the drawing so that it filters out conversations). whew! sorry if that’s all incredibly confusing.

      My own entryway into Moo’s work was his NICNT on Romans before I knew anything about the justification debates. But his contribution in this area definitely quickly became very impactful to me. The most interesting/surprising essay in this book is definitely that by Dunn on what’s right about the Old Perspective. Westerholm also has an essay about what’s right about the New Perspectives. I think these two essays are very beneficial to those who identify strongly with either camp.

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      • That’s alright — I’m not actually in the U.S.

        I believe that Moo’s NICNT is perhaps his most famous work; it’s certainly how many first encounter him. I actually haven’t caught up with Dunn and Westerholm’s essays here, but they do sound interesting, so I’ll see if I can obtain a copy of this compilation.

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  27. Tweeted the giveaway again.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  28. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    Moo’s commentary on Romans in the NICNT impacted me while I was in college. It helped me wrestle with issues of Reformed soteriology, Pauline theology, and the NPP.

    Liked by 1 person

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  29. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    What doesn’t fascinate me about Pauline studies? I guess over all I would have to say I am most fascinate with the redemptive historical aspects of Paul’s theology.

    Liked by 1 person

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    • “What doesn’t fascinate me about Pauline studies?” BEST.ANSWER.EVER. As to the latter statement, spoken like a true Westminsterite 🙂

      Like

      Reply
  30. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    Follow you on twitter.

    Like

    Reply
  31. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    Tweeted this post.

    Like

    Reply
  32. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    I shared this on FB

    Like

    Reply
  33. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    I shared this on Google+

    Like

    Reply
  34. timbertolet

     /  May 14, 2015

    I followed this blog.

    Like

    Reply
  35. For some reason Nate Pickowicz can’t log in to comment and he asked me to comment for him. he followed me on Twitter.

    Like

    Reply
  36. Nate Pickowics tweeted the giveaway

    Like

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  37. And Nate Pickowics gets a bonus entry for tweeting a bunch of awesome memes related to the giveaway, such as https://twitter.com/NatePickowicz/status/598908754214703104

    Like

    Reply
  38. Stefanus K

     /  May 14, 2015

    Moo is one of my favorite NT scholars. I use his NT introduction (co authored with Carson) in NT intro class I teach. I also use his NICNT Romans Commentary in my Romans class. Each time I find some issues in Pauline Studies, his work and thought will be the first I search for.

    Liked by 1 person

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  39. Stefanus K

     /  May 14, 2015

    I love to read discussion about New Perspective on Paul. But, as a Reformed, I think question whether Paul is a natural theologian (i.e. how he views the significance of general revelation in salvation) seems to be more interesting to me 🙂 If God gives me an opportunity to apply for another master degree, I plan to write about this topic 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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  40. Stefanus K

     /  May 14, 2015

    I don’t have Twitter account, but I have shared this to my Facebook friends, LINE friends, and some of my Blackberry Messenger and WhatsApp friends 🙂 Thanks 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  41. Stefanus K

     /  May 14, 2015

    I have subscribed to your blog 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  42. I follow you on Twitter

    Liked by 1 person

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  43. Just re-tweeted your give away

    Liked by 1 person

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  44. I appreciated Dr. Moo’s commentary on James; I need to get around to his commentary on Romans to have more impact from him!

    Liked by 1 person

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    • That’s interesting! The first commentary I ever bought was Moo’s NICNT on Romans. I haven’t read his commentary on James, but I’d like to get around to it soon.

      Liked by 1 person

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      • I realized I often unintentionally read the less important works of famous scholars first before I read their main course =)

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  45. I also follow your blog on WordPress btw

    Liked by 1 person

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  46. I tweeted again!

    Liked by 1 person

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  47. Nate Pickowics tweeted again. I’m still commenting for him because he can’t log in.

    Like

    Reply
  48. Ruth W

     /  May 15, 2015

    Moo has impacted my theology, because his introduction to the NT text (with Carson) was the first academic book I read on the topic!

    P.S. I do maintain a U.S. mailing address 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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    • Carson/Moo/Morris was the first NT intro I read as well 🙂 Although the first I ever read of Moo was his NICNT on Romans.

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      • wait, no!! that’s actually not true, I misremembered. the first NT intro I read was Ehrman’s! the semester after I became a Christian I took a Christian origins course at my (secular) university and Ehrman’s was a required text.

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  49. I’m interested in more application of Greco-Roman texts (and socio-historical/socio-scientific description/modeling) to Pauline studies.

    Liked by 1 person

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  50. Also, I follow you on Twitter!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  51. Followed you on Twitter.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  52. RTed your giveaway tweet.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  53. Issue in Pauline studies that has my attention: how many more pages can N.T. Wright write?

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  54. And I subscribe (already) to your blog. I’m enjoying it!

    Liked by 1 person

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  55. One things which fascinates me, as I imagine others may say too, is how Paul reads the OT in light of Christ. The more we work with the context the more we’re able to see how it is that Paul can make some “extreme” changes. Not only that, but how Paul is actually able to read the OT and see Christ in everything from the major storyline to the tiny details in obscure verses.

    Liked by 1 person

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  56. I posted on Facebook about this giveaway.

    Liked by 1 person

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  57. I tweeted about this giveaway.

    Liked by 1 person

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  58. I am following your blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  59. And following your tweets.

    15 years ago this would sound pretty extreme…

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  60. Retweeted the giveaway!

    Liked by 1 person

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  61. Twee tweet–another giveaway tweet!

    Liked by 1 person

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  62. How has Moo’s scholarship impacted me? Have you ever had his NICNT Roman’s commentary thrown at you? That thing is big.

    But really, read any of my papers about Romans and you’d see how much Moo has guided the way I think about the book, even where I may disagree.

    Liked by 1 person

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    • First thing that comes to my mind when I think of Moo is his NICNT on Romans. That was the first commentary I ever bought and also my first encounter with Moo. Oh, and I know it was just a figure of speech, but I’d love to read your papers about Romans 😀

      Like

      Reply
  63. A Pauline studies issues that interests me…

    Authorship, especially of the pastorals and Pitts’ corpus linguistic analysis in relation to authorship.

    Liked by 1 person

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    • Cool! Unfortunately authorship issues do not interest me at all. I see most debates on matters of introduction as “necessary evils”….they do not captivate me at all, but I wish they did.

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  64. Tweeted the giveaway.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  65. Subscribed to blog.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  66. Shared on fb.

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  67. I already follow you on twitter yo!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  68. The giveaway hath been tweeted once more!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  69. Perhaps this will be the winning tweet?

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
  1. Saturday Sillies – The Moo Edition |

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